Russell's Halloween Controls

Lessons Learned

I belive these truths to be self-evident (and also learned the hard way through trial and error).

No matter how much you want to use them, you will not be happy with wireless relays and controls.

Ohm's Law states that Russell will never understand electricity and electronics. My recommendations are based on trial and error and not science. There are lots of guys in the Halloween Forum that have a deep understanding of these things. I think they are Gods.

Pick a voltage and stick with it. I suggest 12VDC. Don't be tempted by low priced devices like air solenoids of other voltages. You will regret it latter when you look for power supplies and relays to drive them.

I do not like motion or photo sensors. I like to manualy trigger my props remotely. Timing is everything for a good scare. I also enjoy "the dance" where victims make all kinds of motions to trigger a prop. We wait until they get tired then let them have it.

I like to scare with my props. A good scare is actually a startle with three components (1) Fast motion, (2) a flash of light, and (3) a loud sound.

If you use network cable (and you probably will) you MUST use network cables made with solid bare copper wire. PERIOD. You will try much cheaper network cable and think of me while you throw it in the trash.

WARNING

Halloween Props and their components are inherently dangerous and could cause severe injury or death. These instructions are being offered for entertainment purposes only. Do not attempt to actually build or use any of the mechanisms described in the instructions below unless you (1) are aware of every potential safety issue with each component, (2) wear every personal protection device ever invented, and (3) follow all Federal, State, local, and standard industry safety procedures associated with the handling and use of each individual and combined component. KEEP YOUR ARMS, LEGS, HEAD, AND BODY AWAY FROM MOVING PARTS AT ALL TIMES and don't catch yourself on fire. ENJOY!

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